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A Softer Shade for Fall

A Softer Shade for Fall

The calendar tells me it’s fall; until now, the weather in New York was not in agreement. I love the change in season. 

It always brings about a feeling of change and new adventures, and there is, of course, all of the amazing things people love enjoying these days: sweaters and pumpkin everything that goes with chilly weather, changing leaves, apple picking and of course the start of the holiday season. I’m all about it.

When I think of fall colors, for me it’s a lot of oranges, browns, dark reds and burgundies that remind me each year of growing up in a northern suburb of Chicago.Many of these colors are included in the palette of colors Pantone predicted would be hot this season. I think some are slightly richer than last year and include some zesty hues that I think perfectly encapsulate summer’s hesitation to leave each year. 

A pantone color not immediately associated with fall is a soft, feminine pink that is reminiscent of ballet slippers. How unexpected is that? The tone is soft, and just like mother nature's pink that compliments fall colorings, this pink compliments all skin tones.

I have taken my cue from nature and incorporated a beautiful peachy pink Morganite stone in a pair of earrings. My Morganite Crane earrings pictured here are the perfect example of this soft color that’s not only perfect this season, but all seasons and all skin colorings!

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August’s Evening Emerald

August’s Evening Emerald

Sometimes known as the “Evening Emerald” because its sparkling green hue looks brilliant any time of day; Peridot, the birthstone for August, is one of the oldest known gemstones.

It is interesting to note that the Peridot is one of the few gems that come in only one color. It’s tint can very due to its iron content with its exact coloring varying between a yellowish to a perfectly olive green color. The most valuable color variant of Peridot, however, is a dark olive green.

Often mistaken for Emeralds during the Crusades, Peridot is really an under-appreciated gem that is actually quite stunning and can even be seen as part of the Russian crown jewels. I paired a natural Blue Zircon with a Peridot in my Crane earring to compliment the lush green stone. This is a gem with its rich history that will undoubtedly make it a conversational piece in your jewelry collection. So even if your birthstone is not Peridot, you just might want to consider adding it to your jewelry box.

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Patek Philippe’s Grand Exhibition in NY

Patek Philippe’s Grand Exhibition in NY

The brand’s The Art of Watches Grand Exhibition New York opens Thursday, July 13 at Cipriani at 42nd Street, is offering the public a look into its 178-year history and some of its most important pieces. 

For the first time, a two-story structure has been created in the event venue to accommodate its scale. It will feature 10 themed rooms, including a Theater Room, Current Collection Room, Museum Room, U.S. Historic Room, Rare Handcrafts Gallery and Watchmakers Room. 

The U.S. Historic Room will have a curated collection of 27 timepieces on loan from various museums--like the Patek Philippe Museum in Geneva and the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston—as well as from some of the brand’s most renowned private collectors across the country. 

The collection of Graves’ pieces in the U.S Historic Room will showcase six significant watches from the Patek Philippe Museum, including his 1928 open-face, keyless winding pocket watch with minute repeater, Grande Sonnerie, Petite Sonnerie, Perpetual Calendar and Moon Phases.

 The Art of Watches Grand Exhibition New York will run from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. every day (with free admission) through July 23. 

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Bewitching: Black Magic

Bewitching: Black Magic

Walk along the Exotic, playful side of life. Tahitian Pearls are considered the second most valuable commercially farmed pearls in the world and to me, they are bewitching. Many times these pearls are referred to as black, but they have a color range from light creamy white to silver, to green iridescent peacock and to deep black. Unlike black freshwater and black Akoya pearls, which have been irradiated or dyed, Tahitians come by their dark glamor like color naturally.

Beautiful Tahitian pearls are among the largest pearls in the world, ranging in size from approximately 8 mm to 18 mm. These pearls are bead nucleated making many of them round, or near round, with other shapes expressed in drops, baroques, button and circled pearls. When all other factors are equal, the round Tahitian pearls are considered the most valuable.

Interesting to note, while Tahitian pearls carry the name of the famous Tahiti Island, they do not come from Tahiti. Only the pearls from the Black-lip oyster farmed in French Polynesia may be call Tahitian pearls.

The Boris earring (above) was inspired by the mysterious Tahitian Pearl. These Tahitian Pearl earrings have a thick nacre that produces a glorious glow combined with a remarkable color range that appears regal. Wearing them can only transfer that exotic, magical feeling and who doesn’t want to feel regal!

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What's Tough and Sexy?

What's Tough and Sexy?

Palladium! This lovely silvery white metal was discovered in 1803 by William Hyde Wollaston and can be found in Australia, Africa, Canada, South and North America.

Palladium is a rare, precious metal. It is a naturally silver-white metal that requires no plating, resists tarnish and is hypo allergic. An added bonus, palladium is less dense than platinum; it is strong and polishes to a beautiful bright silvery white. Palladium, because it is lighter in weight, makes it possible to design large pieces of jewelry that are comfortable to wear.

 I have often spoken of my love for 22kt gold, the beautiful buttery yellow color makes me feel like I am a king. The luxurious silver white polish of Palladium however, has sparkled its way into my heart. Whether the metal is coupled with diamonds, pearls, gemstones, or left to itself, it is sure to captivate you as well.

 If you are looking for jewelry that remains in the noble metal grouping, but are finding the cost of gold and platinum difficult, I highly recommend 950 Palladium—it is Tough, it is Sexy and certainly will place you ahead of your contemporaries.

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May & Going for the Gold

May & Going for the Gold

Thanks to Gem Gossip, May is becoming known as the month of Gold. As a jewelry designer working in 18kt yellow gold I feel there is no better way for me to launch the month of May than honoring it with this precious metal often celebrated and lusted over by kings, queens and commoners alike since the beginning of time. Aside from the jewelry aspect, gold calls attention to itself not only to jewelry lovers around the world, but also to the many financial gurus’ around the world. Whether gold is found in your pocket or on your wrist, it is important to you.

 The current collection I am featuring on this site is designed and crafted in 18kt yellow gold. I have been drawn to its warm golden color for quite sometime. My collection is about zoomorphic imagery that illustrates the interconnected nature of all living things. Using this noble metal, I have a connection with Mother Earth.

 The yellow gold also provides a continuous journey of visual reflections that remind me of our individual, yet collective journey together on this planet.

 I hope you’ll take time to scroll through the collection and discover a world of interconnection as well as find a reason to celebrate the beauty of nature’s most noble of metals—gold.

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Mood Indigo

Mood Indigo

Why banish the blues? You can add a sense of richness to your jewelry  by adding Tanzanite to your wardrobe. Tanzanite is relatively new to the colored stone galaxy. As the most common story of the tanzanite mining boom goes, in 1967 a Masai tribesman stumbled upon a cluster of highly transparent, intense blue crystals weathering out of the earth in Merelani, an area of northern Tanzania. He alerted a local fortune hunter named Manuel d’Souza, who quickly registered four mining claims. Instead of the mines containing what he thought to be sapphires, he discovered the minds contained a new gem.

Within a short time, 90 more claims appeared in the same 20-square-mile area. No one was quite sure what the beautiful crystals were, but everyone wanted to lay claim to the profits they were certain to produce. The new gem would eventually be known as tanzanite, and it would, at times, rival the Big 3 in popularity.

 Tiffany & Company recognized its potential as an international seller and made a deal to become its main distributor. Tiffany named the gem after the country it came from, and promoted it with a big publicity campaign in 1968. Almost overnight, tanzanite was popular with leading jewelry designers and other gem professionals, as well as with customers who had an eye for beautiful and unusual gems.

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Star Mountain Star Rubies

Star Mountain Star Rubies

These Rubies in June at Guernsey’s auction house in New York City, will be auctioned off. These rubies represent a collection of extraordinary, museum-quality star rubies – described by experts as potentially the best in the world.

Weighing a combined 342 carats, the Mountain Star Ruby Collection consists of four one-of-a-kind gems. Each displays a perfect six-pointed star and their value can only be speculated at.

The most impressive ruby in the collection is called the Appalachian Star. At 139.43, it weighs just over a carat more than the 138-carat Rosser Reeves Star Ruby on display at the Smithsonian. The Rosser Ruby was found in Sri Lanka, the source of most star rubies, alongside Burma. This makes the Mountain Star Ruby collection even more unusual because the gems were found in Appalachia, North Carolina.

The finder, a humble local man and self-confessed “rock hound”, made the discovery in 1990 on one of his regular searches for rare and unusual stones, after which the four stones were examined by gemological testing labs in the US and Europe. He passed away shortly after this find of a lifetime, but not before an exhibition of the Appalachian Star ruby at the Natural History Museum in London in 1992 attracted some 150,000 visitors. The stones have remained with his family ever since.

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SIMPILY POSITIVE

SIMPILY POSITIVE

Celtic lore has many stories relating to the Crane, some rather dark and a few in a more positive light. I became fascinated with a story I came across about cranes being messengers of the gods and having a high degree of wisdom. They often represent higher states of consciousness. My favorite article talked of Cranes avoiding direct confrontation whenever possible, exhibiting a complex array of threatening behaviors when necessary to prevent battles. Thus, Cranes are symbolic of peacekeeping.

 With the swearing in of the 45th President of the United States at a time when the world seems right for many possible conflicts, I think taking a page out of the Crane’s workbook on how to avoid conflict could be in order.

It is with the thought of a higher consciousness that inspired me to create the Crane Earrings you see on this site. See Earring Collection

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Vault into the Big League 2017

Vault into the Big League 2017

On display in Harrods ina small, darkened room on the Ground Floor is perhaps the most valuable object ever to be sold at Harrods. Shining out from the dark is The Harrods Diamond, a 228.31 carat pear-shape stone - a rare specimen and likely amongst one of the largest diamonds of our times. A quality diamond of over 100 carats is impressive; over 200 carats puts the stone into another league.

The diamond has been graded a G colour with VS1 clarity by the Gemological Institute of America. G is the fourth colour on the scale placing it at the top of the ‘near colourless’ spectrum, while VSI indicates that flaws are visible in the table facet. Not perfect, but pretty close, the ideal being D colour (totally colourless) and F clarity (flawless).

Nonetheless, the size of the Harrods Diamond is out of this world. To put it into perspective, the most famous cut diamond in the world is the 530 carat Cullinan I (D colour) that sits at the centre of the sceptre of the British Crown Jewels, safely stowed in the Tower of London. Outsized white diamonds of over 200 carats garner fame, and stars of this arena include the 203.04 carat Millennium Star, the 205.07carat Red Cross and the 234.65 carat De Beers.

 Most remarkable diamonds of this size come with a story: a catalogue of famous owners or, for newer discoveries, a eureka moment at the mine. However, the Harrods Diamond appears to have literally popped up out of the blue. The Harrods press release states: “In the Safe Deposit at the heart of the world-famous Knightsbridge store, home to some of Harrods clients’ most treasured possessions, an incredible diamond has been hiding, a precious stone that is now referred to as “The Harrods Diamond” by its owner [who chooses to remain anonymous] and the stone’s Harrods custodians.” Looking at the photographs, it appears that the stone has been cut recently, suggesting that the diamond that emerged from Harrods was a rough. The size of the rough and its provenance is anyone’s guess.

 Article is originally from the Jewellery editor, Dec. 14.

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